Hi Everybody!!

Hi Everybody!!
Welcome to my Hometown!!

Saturday, May 25, 2013

AND THE HEAT GOES ON..........(AND ON AND ON ALL SUMMER PHOTO BLOG)


Hi Everybody!!
How Hot have You ever got? The heat is coming. I thought we would start out with more "heat wave" images I created in Picasa. You put your photo in edit and push the button that says heat map. Presto, bingo a whole new outlook on life! Tonight, I heated up some images from my road trip to the Herb Farm. Linda is not going to believe this is her place! (HaHa). Anyway, I am making some cards with these bright shots. For your info from the Google Index, I have selected 2 garden delights that you can eat. 
A really different treat!
I caught up with Linda and the landscaping crew, so  the last of your photostudy is also shots from Bluebonnet. This is to remind YOU to go to your garden store and buy shade trees to plant to protect you from the coming Heat.




























































































































































http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daylily

Daylily

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Daylily is the general nonscientific name of a species, hybrid or cultivar of the genus Hemerocallis(pron.: /ˌhɛmɨrˈkælɪs/).[1] Daylily cultivar flowers are highly diverse in colour and form, as a result of hybridization efforts of gardening enthusiasts and professional horticulturalists. Thousands of registered cultivars are appreciated and studied by local and international Hemerocallis societies.[2] Hemerocallis is now placed in familyXanthorrhoeaceae, subfamily Hemerocallidoideae, and formerly was part of Liliaceae (which includes true lilies).
Daylily
Hemerocallis 'Hush Little Baby'
Scientific classificatione
Kingdom:Plantae
Clade:Angiosperms
Clade:Monocots
Order:Asparagales
Family:Xanthorrhoeaceae
Subfamily:Hemerocallidoideae
Genus:Hemerocallis



Culinary use [edit]


Dried golden needles
The flowers of some species[which?] are edible and are used in Chinese cuisine. They are sold (fresh or dried) in Asian markets as gum jum or golden needles (金针 in Chinese; pinyin: jīn zhēn) oryellow flower vegetables (黃花菜 in Chinese; pinyin: huáng huā cài). They are used in hot and sour soup, daylily soup (金針花湯), Buddha's delight, and moo shu pork. The young green leaves and the rhizomes of some (but not all[citation needed]) species are also edible. The plant has also been used for medicinal purposes. Care must be used as some species of lilies can be toxic.







Cicada:

























http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cicada
Cicada
Annual cicada, Tibicen linnei
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Calling song of Magicicada cassini
Scientific classification
Kingdom:Animalia
Phylum:Arthropoda
Class:Insecta
Order:Hemiptera
Suborder:Auchenorrhyncha
Infraorder:Cicadomorpha
Superfamily:Cicadoidea
Family:Cicadidae
Westwood, 1840

Cicadas (/sɪˈkɑːdə/ or pron.: /sɪˈkdə/) are insects in the order Hemiptera, suborder Auchenorrhyncha (which was formerly included in the now invalid suborder Homoptera). Cicadas are in the superfamily Cicadoidea. Their eyes are prominent, though not especially large, and set wide apart on the anterior lateral corners of the frons. The wings are well-developed, with conspicuous veins; in some species the wing membranes are wholly transparent, whereas in many others the proximal parts of the wings are clouded or opaque and some have no significantly clear areas on their wings at all. About 2,500 species of cicada have been described, and many remain to be described. Cicadas live in temperate-to-tropical climates where they are among the most-widely recognized of all insects, mainly due to their large size and unique sound. Cicadas are often colloquially called locusts,[1] although they are unrelated to true locusts, which are various species of swarming grasshopper. Cicadas are related to leafhoppersand spittlebugs.


Cicadas can cause damage to several cultivated crops, shrubs, and trees, mainly in the form of scarring left on tree branches while the females lay their eggs deep in branches.[3][4][5]
Many people around the world regularly eat cicadas. They are known to have been eaten in Ancient Greece as well as ChinaMalaysiaBurmaLatin America, and the Congo.[6] Female cicadas are prized for being meatier.[6]Shells of cicadas are employed in the traditional medicines of China.[7]


Deep-fried Cryptotympana atrata inShandong cuisine

File:Adult Cicada Emerging from Nymph Skin.jpg
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Adult_Cicada_Emerging_from_Nymph_Skin.jpg
Description
English: Adult Cicada Emerging from Nymph Skin
Taken in Auburn, AL on September 9th, 2012. Photographer: Jim DeWitt
Camera: Nikon D40
Date
SourceI took these photos myself, on my property, with my camera.
AuthorRoland311

....this is brendasue signing off from Rainbow Creek.  See You next time! (New summer format-no vids on new posts). By now, You know how to find the vids! And, the Google Index! Celebrate your Smart Self!


















































Bluebonnet Herb Farm       Hempstead, Texas USA
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