Hi Everybody!!

Hi Everybody!!
Welcome to my Hometown!!

Saturday, December 21, 2013

YOU KNOW CHRISTMAS IS NEAR (WHEN THE ELLIES ARE BLOOMING PHOTO BLOG)


Hi Everybody!!
I stopped by the Garden Shop today to get a couple of herb plants and see my friend, Linda. The decorated trees looked so pretty, I snapped a few to share with You. G+Awesome Auto added the twinkle to the lights (thanks guys for the season cheer)! Anyway, I know Christmas is near when my Ellie's begin blooming in December to the delight of winter bees and one hummer. The tiny flowers have a strong cinnamon smell and make fruits called drupes. Ellie is my nickname for the "Elaeagnus Shrub". I have shared info from Wikipedia about these plants, plus photos from my garden. If you still need a present for someone, may I suggest a flowering shrub or tree for the yard. It will last along time! Enjoy!





link to photostudy:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/117645114459863049265/albums/5959972894777406577






My big Ellie!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elaeagnus

Elaeagnus

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Elaeagnus /ˌɛlˈæɡnəs/,[1] silverberry or oleaster, is a genus of about 50–70 species offlowering plants in the family Elaeagnaceae.
Elaeagnus
Elaeagnus commutata
Scientific classification
Kingdom:Plantae
(unranked):Angiosperms
(unranked):Eudicots
(unranked):Rosids
Order:Rosales
Family:Elaeagnaceae
Genus:Elaeagnus
L.

Habitat[edit]

The vast majority of the species are native to temperate and subtropical regions of Asia.Elaeagnus triflora extends from Asia south into northeastern Australia, while E. commutatais native to North America, and Elaeagnus philippinensis is native to the Philippines. One of the Asian species, E. angustifolia, may also be native in southeasternmost Europe, though it may instead be an early human introduction there. Also, several Asiatic species ofElaeagnus have become established as introduced species in North America, with some of these species being considered invasive, or even designated as noxious, in portions of the United States.[2][3]
Elaeagnus plants are deciduous or evergreen shrubs or small trees. The alternate leavesand the shoots are usually covered with tiny silvery to brownish scales, giving the plants a whitish to grey-brown colour from a distance. The flowers are small, with a four-lobed calyxand no petals; they are often fragrant. The fruit is a fleshy drupe containing a single seed; it is edible in many species. Several species are cultivated for their fruit, including E. angustifoliaE. umbellata and E. multiflora (gumi).

Berries from a large-fruited cultivar

Other uses[edit]

E. umbellata is reputed to have a high amount of the carotenoid antioxidantlycopene[6]and has been shown to display antioxidant properties effective against cancer mechanismsin vitro.[7] E. multiflora is among the nutraceutical plants that Chinese use both for food and medicine.[citation needed] Both of these species have small but abundant tasty berries.

Ecology[edit]

Elaeagnus species are used as food plants by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including Coleophora elaeagnisella and the gothic moths. The thorny shrubs can also provide good nesting sites for birds.








link to photostudy:
https://plus.google.com/u/0/photos/117645114459863049265/albums/5960043761565910753













...this is brendasue signing off from Rainbow Creek.  See You next time! 
You better Watch Out! You better not Pout!

O+O