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Monday, September 24, 2012

THE CHILLING NATURE OF ARCTIC OIL (A Cold-Blooded Peak Oil Truth Photo Blog)









File:ArcticLocationMap2.gif



Petroleum exploration in the Arctic

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The exploration of the Arctic for petroleum is more technically challenging than for any other environment. However, with increases in technology and continuing high oil prices the region is now receiving the interest of the petroleum industry.
There are 19 geological basins making up the Arctic region. Some of these basins have experienced oil and gas exploration, most notably the Alaska North Slope where oil was first produced in 1968 from Prudhoe Bay. However, only half the basins - such as the Beaufort Sea and the WestBarents Sea - have been explored.
A 2008 United States Geological Survey estimates that areas north of the Arctic Circle have 90 billion barrels of undiscovered, technically recoverable oil (and 44 billion barrels of natural gas liquids ) in 25 geologically defined areas thought to have potential for petroleum. This represents 13% of the undiscovered oil in the world. Of the estimated totals, more than half of the undiscovered oil resources are estimated to occur in just three geologic provinces - Arctic Alaska, the Amerasia Basin, and the East Greenland Rift Basins.[1][2][3]
More than 70% of the mean undiscovered oil resources is estimated to occur in five provinces: Arctic Alaska, Amerasia Basin, East Greenland Rift Basins, East Barents Basins, and West Greenland–East Canada. It is further estimated that approximately 84% of the undiscovered oil and gas occurs offshore. The USGS did not consider economic factors such as the effects of permanent sea ice or oceanic water depth in its assessment of undiscovered oil and gas resources. This assessment is lower than a 2000 survey, which had included lands south of the arctic circle.[4][5][6]
A recent study carried out by Wood Mackenzie on the Arctic potential comments that the likely remaining reserves will be 75% natural gas and 25% oil. It highlights four basins that are likely to be the focus of the petroleum industry in the upcoming years: the Kronprins Christian Basin, which is likely to have large reserves, the southwest Greenland basin, due to its proximity to markets, and the more oil-prone basins of Laptev and Baffin Bay.

Canada

Extensive drilling was done in the Canadian Arctic during the 1970s and 1980s by such companies as Panarctic Oils Ltd.Petro Canadaand Dome Petroleum. After 176 wells were drilled at billions of dollars of cost, approximately 1.9 billion barrels (300×106 m3) of oil and 19.8 trillion cubic feet (560×109 m3) of natural gas were found. These discoveries were insufficient to justify development, and all the wells which were drilled were plugged and abandoned.
Drilling in the Canadian Arctic turned out to be expensive and dangerous. The geology of the Canadian Arctic turned out to be far more complex than oil-producing regions like the Gulf of Mexico. It was discovered to be gas prone rather than oil prone (i.e. most of the oil had been transformed into natural gas by geological processes), and most of the reservoirs had been fractured by tectonic activity, allowing most of the petroleum which might at one time have been present to leak out.[7]

[edit]Russia

In June 2007, a group of Russian geologists returned from a six-week voyage on a nuclear icebreaker 50 Let Pobedy, the expedition called Arktika 2007. They had travelled to the Lomonosov ridge, an underwater shelf in Russia's remote and inhospitable eastern Arctic Ocean.
According to Russia's media, the geologists returned with the "sensational news" that the Lomonosov ridge was linked to Russian Federation territory, boosting Russia's claim over the oil-and-gas rich triangle. The territory contained 10bn tonnes of gas and oildeposits, the scientists said.[8]
In the early 2012 Russia plans to start the first commercial offshore oil drilling in the Arctic, on Prirazlomnaya platform in the Pechora Sea.[9] The platform will be the first Arctic-class ice-resistant oil rig in the world.

[edit]Greenland

Greenland is believed by some geologists to have some of the world’s largest remaining oil resources.[10] Prospecting is taking place under the auspices of NUNAOIL, a partnership between the Greenland Home Rule Government and the Danish state. U.S. Geological Survey found in 2001 that the waters off north-eastern Greenland (north and south of the arctic circle) could contain up to 110 billion barrels (17×109 m3) of oil.[11]
Greenland has offered 8 license blocks for tender along its west coast by Baffin Bay. Currently 7 of those blocks have been bid for by a combination of multinational oil companies and the National Oil Company NUNAOIL. Companies that have participated successfully in the previous license rounds and have formed a partnership for the licenses with NUNAOIL are, DONG Energy, ChevronExxonMobil, Husky Energy, Cairn Energy. The area available known as the West Disko licensing round is of an interest due to its relative accessibility compared to other Arctic basins as the area remains largely free of ice. As well as a number of promising geological leads and prospects from the Paleocene era.

[edit]Geological basins in the Arctic

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petroleum_exploration_in_the_Arct

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FEATURE PRESENTATIONS: 
VIDEO LINEUP FOR THIS SUBJECT
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Just Push Play (Short vids until Lecture)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R52HoSDtYDs
Uploaded by  on Sep 15, 2009
As the polar ice caps shrink, the international battle for control of the Arctic Ocean, a body of water surrounded by five countries, and its seabed, is escalating.

http://icarusfilms.com/new2009/arc.html

THE BATTLE FOR THE ARCTIC reveals the importance of an ice-free Northwest Passage, a shipping route between Asia and Europe 5,000 kilometers shorter than the Panama Canal route, and examines the competing claims over which nation controls these waters and the natural resources beneath the seabed.
http://www.icarusfilms.com/new2009/arc.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P8S4RN3RUjE
Uploaded by  on Oct 22, 2007
Sep 2007
As the scramble for Arctic resources intensifies, Canada is stepping up its military presence in the region. It's determined to protect its national sovereignty. "We will not compromise the defence of Canadian territory", vows Prime Minster Stephen Harper, announcing plans for more polar patrol ships. As the Arctic warms up; "major corporations are waking up to the fact there is going to be tremendous economic opportunity", explains Prof Huebert. Canada, Russia, Denmark and Norway all have claims to the Arctic seabed, where vast mineral reserves are thought to lie. There's concern that this scramble for resources could spiral out of control. "The worst case scenario is one of a regional area where hostilities are the norm and co-operation the exception", warns Huebert. The other main dispute is the legal status of the North West passage, which could dramatically shorten shipping times between Europe and Asia. "Canada considers all of the waters within the Canadian arctic archipelago to be internal waters", explains Prof Donat Pharand. But other countries see the passage as an international strait. "This is a dispute between Canada and the world", claims US Ambassador David Wilkins. A summit is planned for next year to discuss the future of the region.

Produced by ABC Australia
Distributed by Journeyman Pictures

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ow1w33VAPII
Uploaded by  on Jul 5, 2007
This animated map is an excerpt from a conference presentation by Randy Park. It shows the peaking of oil production (peak oil) for countries around the world. It also shows oil consumption.

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gHKp5vF_VoE
Uploaded by  on Apr 26, 2008
A Quick 3 minute video visually explaining Peak Oil, what oil is used for, and what the future may hold with regards to Peak Oil.

This is the culmination of my year-long thesis project looking at how Graphic Design can help communicate a complex topic such as Peak Oil.

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VXYOOvGLzfI
Uploaded by  on Jun 5, 2008
Global oil reserves 2:13
CNN's Guillermo Arduino takes a look at where the world's oil is coming from.

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Standard YouTube License

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3sPDNR2YS3s
Uploaded by  on Jan 2, 2008
Watch the full film here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xT-a6jes4mk&feature=plcp&context=C3ae2...

For downloads and more information, visit:http://www.journeyman.tv/56777/documentaries/peak-oil.html

Is the age of cheap oil about to come to an end? According to many experts, we are about to reach the point of "peak oil" -- the level at which supply can no longer keep up with demand. This, say the doomsayers, could send economies spinning into turmoil and up-end our comfortable, urban lifestyles. But others claim predictions like this are simply scaremongering. They believe supply will match demand for decades to come. So who's telling the truth? 'Peak Oil' investigates.

Produced by ABC Australia
Distributed by Journeyman Pictures

September 2006

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....this is brendasue signing off from Rainbow Creek.  See You next time.
PEACE BE WITH YOU~Love!!!!!!!!!!!!!


This is a great lecture uploaded by Stanford University. The Future of Oil (NOW)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTsYjRqPmNA
Uploaded by  on Oct 1, 2009
Roland Horne, Thomas Davies Barrow Professor in the School of Earth Sciences at Stanford University, discusses the future of oil. The Energy Seminar meets weekly during the academic year. For a list of upcoming talks, visit the events page at the Woods Institute for the Environment website.

Stanford University:
http://www.stanford.edu/

Woods Institute for the Environment at Stanford:
http://woods.stanford.edu/

Roland Horne
http://pangea.stanford.edu/~horne/horne.html

Stanford University Channel on YouTube:
http://www.youtube.com/stanford

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Of Course, one more great presentation
Just Push Play
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vSLHvZnbYwc
Uploaded by  on Dec 17, 2008
Dangerous - Melting Permafrost Accelerating Global Warming

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Standard YouTube License
Bonus Video-this is good also-
Just Push Play
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xYxyv8WUQjo

Uploaded by  on Jan 19, 2012
Dr Katharine Giles (UCL Centre for Polar Observation & Modelling)

The Arctic's supposed promise of abundant natural resources, shipping routes and scientific discoveries, has a long held fascination for those prepared to brave its harsh environment. With climate models predicting that the Polar Regions are the most sensitive to climate change, our need to understand them becomes increasingly important. The sub-zero temperatures and inhospitable icescapes faced by explorers also present problems to scientists collecting data.

This lecture focuses on how satellites can help us understand the changing Arctic, and also comes back down to Earth to show UCL scientists stepping out onto the frozen ocean to validate the European Space Agency's CryoSat-2 satellite, which is designed to measure changes in the ice cover with unprecedented accuracy.

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License:

Standard YouTube License


http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0b/West_Texas_Pumpjack.JPG/300px-West_Texas_Pumpjack.JPG&imgrefurl=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oil_well&h=225&w=300&sz=11&tbnid=yoIGSkePfFf2EM:&tbnh=90&tbnw=120&zoom=1&usg=__I61hZTJ5WyiHWBIE-x_-ZFbWfPs=&docid=DpbvTX3Pkz8OKM&hl=en&sa=X&ei=FQRhUKq7BKbA2gXnroDADA&ved=0CDgQ9QEwAQ&dur=2074
O+O