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Hi Everybody!!
Welcome to my Hometown!!

Wednesday, September 26, 2012

THE WATER IS RISING SO WE ARE FLYING TO ANTARCTICA TO VIEW THE ICE!!!! COME ON!!!!! (A South Pole Ice Photo Blog)



Hi Everybody!!
Like You, I have seen news clips of people experiencing flooding from different weather systems. Particularly in Louisiana, I heard someone saying the 'Government and the Army Corps of Engineers need to stop all the Flooding'.
NEWSFLASH:                                   
There is nothing any Government or Engineers can do to stop the storms or flooding. The water IS going to keep rising in the oceans and flood prone areas WILL become more flood prone in the future. If You made the choice to live on the coast (like 80% of all people in the world), then You must make a choice to relocate if You are concerned about rising water. It is that simple. 
(HA! I am packing up myself and it is difficult!)                                          
It is much easier to deny there are any Earth Changes going on and business is as usual. My own kids have said: Mom, You are not going to leave Rainbow Creek. Everything is fine.                
Whatever anybody wants to believe is just fine with me.                          
You have to take care of You.
I am going to provide You with the following facts for you to look at if You want to. You must know at this moment in time, if there is never another earthquake, volcano eruption, tsunami, hurricane, continental drift or even rainstorm or sunstorm- THE WATER IS RISING. Regardless of anything else, it will continue to rise from the melting of the Ice, everywhere. These are not my conclusions, rather the following:

File:Antarctica.svg





FROM WIKIPEDIA:

Ice mass and global sea level

Flow of Ice Across Antarctica.ogv
The motion of ice in Antarctica
Due to its location at the South Pole, Antarctica receives relatively little solar radiation. This means that it is a very cold continent where water is mostly in the form of ice. Precipitation is low (most of Antarctica is a desert) and almost always in the form of snow, which accumulates and forms a giant ice sheet which covers the land. Parts of this ice sheet form moving glaciers known as ice streams, which flow towards the edges of the continent. Next to the continental shore are many ice shelves. These are floating extensions of outflowing glaciers from the continental ice mass. Offshore, temperatures are also low enough that ice is formed from seawater through most of the year. It is important to understand the various types of Antarctic ice to understand possible effects on sea levels and the implications of global warming.
Sea ice extent expands annually in the Antarctic winter and most of this ice melts in the summer. This ice is formed from the ocean water and floats in the same water and thus does not contribute to rise in sea level. The extent of sea ice around Antarctica has remained roughly constant in recent decades, although the thickness changes are unclear.[90][91]
Melting of floating ice shelves (ice that originated on the land) does not in itself contribute much to sea-level rise (since the ice displaces only its own mass of water). However it is the outflow of the ice from the land to form the ice shelf which causes a rise in global sea level. This effect is offset by snow falling back onto the continent. Recent decades have witnessed several dramatic collapses of large ice shelves around the coast of Antarctica, especially along the Antarctic Peninsula. Concerns have been raised that disruption of ice shelves may result in increased glacial outflow from the continental ice mass.[92]
On the continent itself, the large volume of ice present stores around 70% of the world's fresh water.[25] This ice sheet is constantly gaining ice from snowfall and losing ice through outflow to the sea. West Antarctica is currently experiencing a net outflow of glacial ice, which will increase global sea level over time. A review of the scientific studies looking at data from 1992 to 2006 suggested that a net loss of around 50 gigatonnes of ice per year was a reasonable estimate (around 0.14 mm of sea level rise).[93] Significant acceleration of outflow glaciers in the Amundsen Sea Embayment may have more than doubled this figure for 2006.[94]
East Antarctica is a cold region with a ground base above sea level and occupies most of the continent. This area is dominated by small accumulations of snowfall which becomes ice and thus eventually seaward glacial flows. The mass balance of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet as a whole is thought to be slightly positive (lowering sea level) or near to balance.[93][94] However, increased ice outflow has been suggested in some regions.[94][95]

Effects of global warming

Antarctican Temperature
Warming trend from 1957–2006
Legend
Some of Antarctica has been warming up; particularly strong warming has been noted on the Antarctic Peninsula. A study by Eric Steig published in 2009 noted for the first time that the continent-wide average surface temperature trend of Antarctica is slightly positive at >0.05 °C (0.09 °F) per decade from 1957 to 2006. This study also noted that West Antarctica has warmed by more than 0.1 °C (0.2 °F) per decade in the last 50 years, and this warming is strongest in winter and spring. This is partly offset by fall cooling in East Antarctica.[96] There is evidence from one study that Antarctica is warming as a result of human carbon dioxide emissions.[97] However, the small amount of surface warming in West Antarctica is not believed to be directly affecting the West Antarctic Ice Sheet's contribution to sea level. Instead the recent increases in glacier outflow are believed to be due to an inflow of warm water from the deep ocean, just off the continental shelf.[98][99]The net contribution to sea level from the Antarctic Peninsula is more likely to be a direct result of the much greater atmospheric warming there.[100]
In 2002 the Antarctic Peninsula's Larsen-B ice shelf collapsed.[101] Between 28 February and 8 March 2008, about 570 square kilometres (220 sq mi) of ice from the Wilkins Ice Shelf on the southwest part of the peninsula collapsed, putting the remaining 15,000 km2 (5,800 sq mi) of the ice shelf at risk. The ice was being held back by a "thread" of ice about 6 km (4 mi) wide,[102][103] prior to its collapse on 5 April 2009.[104][105] According to NASA, the most widespread Antarctic surface melting of the past 30 years occurred in 2005, when an area of ice comparable in size to California briefly melted and refroze; this may have resulted from temperatures rising to as high as 5 °C (41 °F)
(SEE CONTINUED WIKIPEDIA TEXT FOR ANTARCTICA AND LINK BELOW)


Current sea level rise

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Current_sea_level_rise
Trends in global average absolute sea level, 1870-2008.[1]
Changes in sea level since the end of the last glacial episode.
Even though the oceans are all connected, sea level does not rise or fall uniformly over the planet.[2] The map above shows where average sea level in 2011 was above or below the long-term average. Places where sea level rose up to 8 inches higher than the 1993-2011 average are dark blue, average levels are white, and places where sea level fell below average are brown.[2]
Sea levels around the world are risingCurrent sea-level rise potentially impacts human populations (e.g., those living in coastal regions and on islands)[3] and the natural environment (e.g., marine ecosystems).[4] Global average sea level rose at an average rate of around 1.7 ± 0.3 mm per year from 1950 to 2009 and at a satellite-measured average rate of about 3.3 ± 0.4 mm per year from 1993 to 2009,[5] an increase on earlier estimates.[6] It is unclear whether the increased rate reflects an increase in the underlying long-term trend.[7]
Two main factors contributed to observed sea level rise.[8] The first is thermal expansion: as ocean water warms, it expands.[9] The second is from the contribution of land-based ice due to increased melting. The major store of water on land is found in glaciers and ice sheets.
Sea level rise is one of several lines of evidence that support the view that the climate has recently warmed.[10] It is likely that human-induced (anthropogenic) warming contributed to the sea level rise observed in the latter half of the 20th century.[11]
Sea level rise is expected to continue for centuries.[12] In 2007, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) projected that during the 21st century, sea level will rise another 18 to 59 cm (7.1 to 23 in), but these numbers do not include "uncertainties in climate-carbon cycle feedbacks nor do they include the full effects of changes in ice sheet flow".[13] Although IPCC explicitly refrained from projecting an upper limit of total sea level rise in the 21st century, one meter of sea level rise is well within the range of more recent projections.[13][14]
On the timescale of centuries to millennia, the melting of ice sheets could result in even higher sea level rise. Partial deglaciation of the Greenland ice sheet, and possibly theWest Antarctic ice sheet, could contribute 4 to 6 m (13 to 20 ft) or more to sea level rise.










In 2011, Rignot and others projected a rise of 32 centimetres (13 in) by 2050. Their projection included increased contributions from the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets. Use of two completely different approaches reinforced the Rignot projection.[47][48]

[edit]After 2100

There is a widespread consensus that substantial long-term sea-level rise will continue for centuries to come.[12] IPCC 4 estimated that at least a partial deglaciation of the Greenland ice sheet, and possibly the West Antarctic ice sheet, would occur given a global average temperature increase of 1–4 °C (relative to temperatures over the years 1990–2000).[49] This estimate was given about a 50% chance of being correct.[50] The estimated timescale was centuries to millennia, and would contribute 4 to 6 metres (13 to 20 ft) or more to sea levels over this period.
There is the possibility of a rapid change in glaciers, ice sheets, and hence sea level.[51] Predictions of such a change are highly uncertain due to a lack of scientific understanding. Modeling of the processes associated with a rapid ice-sheet and glacier change could potentially increase future projections of sea-level rise.

[edit]Projected impacts

Future sea level rise could lead to potentially catastrophic difficulties for shore-based communities in the next centuries: for example, many major cities such as London and New Orleans already need storm-surge defenses, and would need more if the sea level rose, though they also face issues such as subsidence.[52] Sea level rise could also displace many shore-based populations: for example it is estimated that a sea level rise of just 200 mm could create 740,000 homeless people in Nigeria.[53] MaldivesTuvalu, and other low-lying countries are among the areas that are at the highest level of risk. The UN's environmental panel has warned that, at current rates, sea level would be high enough to make the Maldives uninhabitable by 2100.[54][55]
Future sea-level rise, like the recent rise, is not expected to be globally uniform (details below). Some regions show a sea-level rise substantially more than the global average (in many cases of more than twice the average), and others a sea level fall.[56] However, models disagree as to the likely pattern of sea level change.[57]
In September 2008, the Delta Commission (Deltacommissie (2007)) presided by Dutch politician Cees Veerman advised in a report that the Netherlands would need a massive new building program to strengthen the country's water defenses against the anticipated effects of global warming for the next 190 years. This commission was created in September 2007, after the damage caused by Hurricane Katrina prompted reflection and preparations. Those included drawing up worst-case plans for evacuations. The plan included more than €100 billion (US$144 bn), in new spending through the year 2100 to take measures, such as broadening coastal dunes and strengthening sea and river dikes.
The commission said the country must plan for a rise in the North Sea up to 4.25 feet (51 inches, 1.3 m) by 2100, rather than the previously projected 2.5 feet (30 inches, 0.80 m), and plan for a 6.5 - 13 feet (78 - 156 inches, 1.98 - 3.96 m) rise by 2200.[58]

Sea Level Rise Simulations

Just Push Play
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_4YUieDlAuM
Uploaded by  on May 26, 2011
http://www.rockware.com (RockWare Website)
Produced with the free EarthApps program from RockWare Inc.

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Sea level rise on the US Gulf Coast

these are all under one minute-just push play
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6szDWFeT5dw
Uploaded by  on Nov 2, 2007
Potential sea level rise on the US Gulf Coast resulting from global warming and the complete melting of the polar ice sheets

This video shows sea level from the present-day location to the level estimated if the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets melt completely.

Source: http://www.panglosstech.com/

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Sea level rise in Northern Europe

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=skMO4GN1rns
Uploaded by  on Nov 3, 2007
Potential sea level rise in Northern Europe resulting from global warming and the complete melting of the polar ice sheets

This video shows sea level from the present-day location to the level estimated if the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets melt completely.

Source: http://www.panglosstech.com/

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Sea level rise in the Amazon Basin

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E58eImFA9oM
Uploaded by  on Nov 3, 2007
Potential sea level rise in the Amazon Basin resulting from global warming and the complete melting of the polar ice sheets.

This video shows sea level from the present-day location to the level estimated if the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets melt completely.

Source: http://www.panglosstech.com/

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Sea level increase 80m

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQumsIh0IOc
Uploaded by  on Dec 2, 2008
This video shows our World after increaseing sea level for 80m higher than todays level.

01.2009 - Viewed 1k+ :)

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OKAY!  We have seen enough water, let's go see some ICE!!!!!!


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antarctica

Antarctica

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Antarctica
Location Antarctica.svg
This map uses an orthographic projection, near-polar aspect. The South Pole is near the center, wherelongitudinal lines converge.
Area (overall)

(ice-free)

(ice-covered)
14,000,000 km2(5,400,000 sq mi)[1]
280,000 km2 (110,000 sq mi)

13,720,000 km2(5,300,000 sq mi)
Population
(permanent)
(non-permanent)
7th
0
approx. 1,000 - 5,000
Dependencies
Official Territorial claimsAntarctic Treaty System
Reserved the right to make claims
Time ZonesNone
UTC-03:00 (Graham Land only)
Antarctica (Listeni/æntˈɑrtɨkə/ or /ænˈtɑrktɨkə/)[Note 1] is Earth's southernmostcontinent, containing the geographic South Pole. It is situated in the Antarctic region of the Southern Hemisphere, almost entirely south of the Antarctic Circle, and is surrounded by the Southern Ocean. At 14.0 million km2 (5.4 million sq mi), it is the fifth-largest continent in area after AsiaAfricaNorth America, and South America. For comparison, Antarctica is nearly twice the size of Australia. About 98% of Antarctica is covered by ice that averages at least 1 mile (1.6 km) in thickness.
Antarctica, on average, is the coldest, driest, and windiest continent, and has the highest average elevation of all the continents.[4] Antarctica is considered a desert, with annual precipitation of only 200 mm (8 inches) along the coast and far less inland.[5] The temperature in Antarctica has reached −89 °C (−129 °F). There are no permanent human residents, but anywhere from 1,000 to 5,000 people reside throughout the year at the research stations scattered across the continent. Only cold-adapted organisms survive there, including many types of algaeanimals (for example mitesnematodespenguinsseals and tardigrades), bacteriafungi,plants, and protista. Vegetation where it occurs is tundra.
Although myths and speculation about a Terra Australis ("Southern Land") date back to antiquity, the first confirmed sighting of the continent is commonly accepted to have occurred in 1820 by the Russian expedition of Fabian Gottlieb von Bellingshausen and Mikhail Lazarev on Vostok and Mirny. The continent, however, remained largely neglected for the rest of the 19th century because of its hostile environment, lack of resources, and isolation. The Antarctic Treaty was signed in 1959 by 12 countries; to date, 49 countries have signed the treaty. The treaty prohibits military activities and mineral mining, prohibits nuclear explosions and nuclear waste disposal, supports scientific research, and protects the continent'secozone. Ongoing experiments are conducted by more than 4,000 scientists from many nations.

Geography





Centered asymmetrically around the South Pole and largely south of the Antarctic Circle, Antarctica is the southernmost continent and is surrounded by the Southern Ocean; alternatively, it may be considered to be surrounded by the southern PacificAtlantic, and Indian Oceans, or by the southern waters of the World Ocean. It covers more than 14,000,000 km2 (5,400,000 sq mi),[1]making it the fifth-largest continent, about 1.3 times as large as Europe. The coastline measures 17,968 km (11,165 mi)[1] and is mostly characterized by ice formations, as the following table shows:
Coastal types around Antarctica[24]
TypeFrequency
Ice shelf (floating ice front)44%
Ice walls (resting on ground)38%
Ice stream/outlet glacier (ice front or ice wall)13%
Rock5%
Total100%
Antarctica is divided in two by the Transantarctic Mountains close to the neck between the Ross Sea and the Weddell Sea. The portion west of the Weddell Sea and east of the Ross Sea is called West Antarctica and the remainder East Antarctica, because they roughly correspond to the Western and Eastern Hemispheres relative to theGreenwich meridian.

Elevation colored by relief height
About 98% of Antarctica is covered by the Antarctic ice sheet, a sheet of ice averaging at least 1.6 km (1.0 mi) thick. The continent has about 90% of the world's ice (and thereby about 70% of the world's fresh water). If all of this ice were melted, sea levels would rise about 60 m (200 ft).[25] In most of the interior of the continent, precipitation is very low, down to 20 mm (0.8 in) per year; in a few "blue ice" areas precipitation is lower than mass loss bysublimation and so the local mass balance is negative. In the dry valleys the same effect occurs over a rock base, leading to a desiccated landscape.
West Antarctica is covered by the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. The sheet has been of recent concern because of the real, if small, possibility of its collapse. If the sheet were to break down, ocean levels would rise by several metres in a relatively geologically short period of time, perhaps a matter of centuries. Several Antarctic ice streams, which account for about 10% of the ice sheet, flow to one of the many Antarctic ice shelves.
East Antarctica lies on the Indian Ocean side of the Transantarctic Mountains and comprisesCoats LandQueen Maud LandEnderby LandMac. Robertson LandWilkes Land and Victoria Land. All but a small portion of this region lies within the Eastern Hemisphere. East Antarctica is largely covered by the East Antarctic Ice Sheet.

Mount Erebus, an active volcano on Ross Island
Vinson Massif, the highest peak in Antarctica at 4,892 m (16,050 ft), is located in theEllsworth Mountains. Antarctica contains many other mountains, both on the main continent and the surrounding islands. Located on Ross Island, Mount Erebus is the world's southernmost active volcano. Another well-known volcano is found on Deception Island, which is famous for a giant eruption in 1970. Minor eruptions are frequent and lava flow has been observed in recent years. Other dormant volcanoes may potentially be active.[26] In 2004, an underwater volcano was found in the Antarctic Peninsula by American and Canadian researchers. Recent evidence shows this unnamed volcano may be active.[27]
Antarctica is home to more than 70 lakes that lie at the base of the continental ice sheet.Lake Vostok, discovered beneath Russia's Vostok Station in 1996, is the largest of thesesubglacial lakes. It was once believed that the lake had been sealed off for 500,000 to one million years but a recent survey suggests that, every so often, there are large flows of water from one lake to another.[28]
There is some evidence, in the form of ice cores drilled to about 400 m (1,300 ft) above the water line, that Lake Vostok's waters may contain microbial life. The frozen surface of the lake shares similarities with Jupiter's moon Europa. If life is discovered in Lake Vostok, this would strengthen the argument for the possibility of life on Europa.[29] On 7 February 2008, a NASA team embarked on a mission toLake Untersee, searching for extremophiles in its highly alkaline waters. If found, these resilient creatures could further bolster the argument for extraterrestrial life in extremely cold, methane-rich environments.[30]


HOORAY-THE STUDY IS COMPLETE-
OUR FIELD TRIP BEGINS HERE!
JUST PUSH PLAY******************
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jdq8uNHCNk
Published on May 29, 2012 by 
When the BBC & Discovery Channel decided to explore Antarctica for their popular Frozen Planet series, they turned to Quark Expeditions.

No other travel company does only polar travel and features more polar scientists, historians and biologists on its trips. Our Expedition Leaders know these regions -- in fact two of them are Nobel Prize Winners.

Antarctica was voted one of the 'World's Top Destinations' of 2012 by CNN and the New York Times. As anyone who has visited will tell you, it's a special place not easily forgotten.

There's never been a better time to take that trip of a lifetime.

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ALL ABOARD: 
DESTINATION: ANTARCTICA!!!!!!!!!!!!
Just Push Play
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFWq9WghFyU
Uploaded by  on Dec 17, 2008
Recorded on December 31, 2006. The video begins in Sydney, Australia as we board our Qantas 747-400ER. Once on board the scenic flight is captured from seat 1A in the first class cabin. As we taxi to the runway Captain John Dennis welcomes us aboard. The entire takeoff is captured complete with audio communication with the control tower. Once airbourne a brass band entertains as we make our way to the continent. We then fly over the Antarctica coast and the breathtaking beauty of the most remote place on Earth unfolds below us.

Part Two @ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qhy1hVA2E7c&fmt=18

From: http://timvp.com

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The Following is a new site I discovered this morning
This is a great Site to add to your research sites. So many things to see here!!  More videos. More articles. Below is the beginning text from today written by Kieran Mulvaney. Please see remainder of text and more videos on Site at the following link:

Discovery News
http://news.discovery.com/earth/the-difference-between-arctic-and-antarctic-sea-ice-120926.html

NORTH VS SOUTH: POLAR SEA ICE AT THE EXTREMES

Kieran Mulvaney
Analysis by Kieran Mulvaney
Wed Sep 26, 2012 05:50 AM ET 



"The world's media is extremely excited at the thirty-year record low extent of sea ice at the North Pole which occurred just days ago: but almost nobody is reporting on the fact that something almost equally unusual is going on down around the coasts of Antarctica," wrote Lewis Page in The Register.
That echoed a post on Forbes a few days earlier from James Taylor, who observed that "Antarctic sea ice set another record this past week, with the most amount of ice ever recorded on day 256 of the calendar year (September 12 of this leap year)… Sea ice around one pole is shrinking while sea ice around another pole is growing."
So what does that mean? Is everything in fact OK? Are the two somehow balancing each other out? And why is one increasing while one declines?
The first thing to remember is that these are two entirely different ecosystems. There is no global sea ice budget that needs to be balanced. Secondly, we're talking two different measurements: Winter extent in the Antarctic versus summer extent in the Arctic. Theoretically, a better apples-to-apples comparison might be summer extent in the two, but that won't work, and the reason why it won't work gets to the heart of why scientists are much more interested in and concerned by what's happening to sea ice in the Arctic.
Antarctic maximaThe Antarctic is a continent surrounded by ocean. As a consequence, in the summer, sea ice is free to break up and drift northward unimpeded, where the great majority of it melts every summer, climate change or no climate change.
The Arctic is an ocean surrounded by land: There are very few escape routes for the sea ice that forms each winter, and so although some melts each year, some stays, surviving the summer Arctic minimaand thickening each winter.
The Antarctic has very little of the multiyear sea ice traditionally found in the Arctic; it is the disappearance of that multiyear ice, and the overall thinning - and thus a dramatic decrease in volume, as well as extent - of the ice cap that is so significant when discussing summer sea ice loss in the northern hemisphere.
It is worth pointing out as an aside that, as we can see from the graphs at left, any increase in Antarctic winter sea ice is hardly on the same level as the summer decrease at the other end of the world. (I recognize that by comparing the two, I too am guilty of the apples-to-oranges misdemeanor I mentioned earlier, but I bring it up only to address the implication of equivalency in the blogs quoted at the beginning of this post.)
But even so, while it may be relatively insignificant, there is indeed a slight upward trend in Antarctic sea ice extent in the winter. So, why? Does it somehow 'disprove' global warming? Hardly. Implicit in that notion is that the waters of the Southern Ocean must be somehow cooling. But they aren't. In fact, the Southern Ocean is warming faster than the global trend. This ocean warming is a driving force behind concerns over the stability of some west Antarctic glaciers.
As Judith Curry of Georgia Tech University explained to the Houston Chronicle's Eric Berger, "In the case of the Arctic most of the melting is driven from the warmer atmosphere above. In the Antarctic most of the melting has been driven from the ocean below." But, research by Curry - who, as Berger points out, is a noted critic of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change - and colleagues suggests that Southern Ocean warming is leading to greater precipitation, which falls as snow. This increases the albedo of sea ice, reflecting heat away from its surface and protecting it from atmospheric warming; and also freshens the surface layer of the ocean, stabilizing it and holding back the warmer water from below.
Under that scenario, the Antarctic sea ice situation may remain relatively stable for a few decades yet; ultimately, however, even the fresher upper ocean will become warm enough to melt the ice from below, while precipitation will begin to fall as rain, melting the ice from above. When that happens, winter sea ice in the Antarctic will also begin to decline in extent.
As John Cook of Skeptical Science observes, "Antarctic sea ice is a complex and unique phenomenon. The simplistic interpretation that it must be cooling around Antarctica is decidedly not the case. Warming is happening - how it affects specific regions is complicated."

++++++++++++++++++++++++
FEATURE PRESENTATION:
ANTARCTIC ICE MELTING VIDEOS  
JUST PUSH PLAY
++++++++++++++++++++++++
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XjjZzAwkRNw
Uploaded by  on Feb 28, 2012
"Sea level rise is an indicator that our planet is warming. Much of the world's population lives on or near the coast, and rising seas are something worth watching. Sea level can rise for two reasons, both linked to a warming planet. When ice on land, such as mountain glaciers or the ice sheets of Greenland or Antarctica, melt, that water contributes to sea level rise. And when our oceans get warmer - another indicator of climate change - the water expands, also making sea level higher. Using satellites, lasers, and radar in space, and dedicated researchers on the ground, NASA is studying the Earth's ice and water to better understand how sea level rise might affect us all. "

Videos from NASA - Multimedia - Video Gallery:
Melting Ice, Rising Seashttp://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/videogallery/index.html?media_id=95567951
Fly Through of Pine Island Glacier Crack -http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/videogallery/index.html?media_id=133528571
This animation provides a fly through of the major rift in the Pine Island Glacier in western Antarctica. This crack, which extends at least 18 miles and is 50 meters deep, could produce an iceberg more than 800 square kilometers in size. Operation IceBridge discovered the crack in October 2011 during the Antarctic field campaign. www.nasa.gov/isebidge

"Longing" by snowflake
http://ccmixter.org/files/snowflake/33325
2011 - Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution (3.0)

Global Warming - Antarctica Ice

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h5-F30YFEv8
Uploaded by  on Nov 10, 2007
Glaciers on the Antarctic Peninsula are melting away at an alarming rate.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r2ceKlzF6Ak
Uploaded by  on Mar 26, 2008
A chunk of the Wilkins ice shelf 7 times the size of Manhattan began collapsing almost a month ago. Scientists say the melting of the shelf is another sign of global warming, as temperatures have risen dramatically in Antarctica over the last 50 years. The collapse of the shelf is also a concern because it acts as a buttress for continental ice, which will erode more quickly and lead to rising sea level without the buffer.

*****BONUS*****  (THIS IS SOOOOO COOL)

Volcanic Ice Crystals of Antarctica | Frozen 

Planet

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n7SZb53TE6U
Published on Apr 12, 2012 by 
Watch FROZEN PLANET Sundays at 8PM e/p on Discovery. |http://dsc.discovery.com/tv/frozen-planet/#mkcpgn=ytdsc1 | Under the ice and snow of Antarctica's only active volcano, Mount Erebus, lies a network of caves harboring incredible ice formations that occur nowhere else on earth.

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Time to say Goodbye for now!

Last Flight from the South Pole

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UtISR1_OzSQ&feature=related
...this is brendasue signing off from Rainbow Creek. See You next time.
Big Hugs and Kisses!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
We are going to "Party" out of here-
Just Push Play!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qhy1hVA2E7c
Uploaded by  on Dec 17, 2008
The spectacular flight over Antarctica continues in part two. At midnight we ring in the New Year as the band plays Auld Lang Syne.

Part One @ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aFWq9WghFyU&fmt=18

From: http://timvp.com

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Of course, one more great performance with fantastic Music by Vangelis and superb images of Antarctica
Just Push Play********LOVE TO ALL**
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GOwuniIgYXM

image credit:
File:Antarctica.svg
http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=File:Antarctica.svg&page=1


Description
English: Transantarctic Mountains, West Antarctica, East Antarctica
Dateunknown
Sourceextracted from http://lima.nasa.gov/pdf/A3_overview.pdf
AuthorLandsat Image Mosaic of Antarctica team
Permission
(Reusing this file)
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