Hi Everybody!!

Hi Everybody!!
Welcome to my Hometown!!

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

STILL TALKING ABOUT WHAT'S HOT AROUND HERE AND (ANOTHER LOWLY PRINCE ANOLE~ TALE PHOTO BLOG)

Hi Everybody!!
Welcome to All and big Hello to all the new people stopping by the mini-nature Blog! Tonight we continue looking at What is Hot in Texas and which flowers like it Hot. *Also, another photoadventure of  my garden lizard named:  Prince Anole~. The Prince says he is Smokin Hot!  I will let the photos tell the tale of the two tails in the Hot Sun on the Fence.  Your photostudy tonight is of several Flowers blooming now in the Hot June Heat. Your infostudy is from Wikipedia about those flowers.
Enjoy!

































http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Combretum_indicum

Combretum indicum

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Combretum indicum, also known as the Chinese honeysuckle or Rangoon creeper, is a vine with red flower clusters and is found in Asia. It is found in many other parts of the world either as a cultivated ornamental or run wild. Other names for the plant include Quiscual (in Spanish), Niyog-niyogan (in Filipino), Madhu Malti or Madhumalti (in Hindi), Akar Dani (in Malay) and Radha Manoharam (in Telugu).


Rangoon creeper
Scientific classification
Kingdom:Plantae
(unranked):Angiosperms
(unranked):Eudicots
(unranked):Rosids
Order:Myrtales
Family:Combretaceae
Genus:Combretum
Species:C. indicum
Binomial name
Combretum indicum
(L.) DeFilipps

Description[edit]

The Rangoon creeper is a ligneous vine that can reach from 2.5 meters to up to 8 meters. The leaves are elliptical with an acuminate tip and a rounded base. They grow from 7 to 15 centimeters and their arrangement is opposite. The flowers are fragrant and tubular and their color varies from white to pink to red. The 30 to 35 mm long fruit is ellipsoidal and has five prominent wings. The fruit tastes like almonds when mature. The niyog-niyogan is usually dispersed by water.
Rangoon creeper is found in thickets or secondary forests of the PhilippinesIndia and Malaysia. It has since been cultivated and naturalized in tropical areas.









































At the Post Office in town:  Desert Bird of Paradise














http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caesalpinia_gilliesii

Caesalpinia gilliesii

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Caesalpinia gilliesii is a shrub in the legume family. It is commonly known as bird of paradise, but it is not related to the bird of paradise genus Strelitzia. It grows to 1–4 m tall, depending on rainfall. The leaves are bipinnate, 10–15 cm long, bearing 3-10 pairs of pinnae, each with 6-10 pairs of leaflets 5–6 mm long and 2–4 mm broad. The flowers are borne in racemes up to 20 cm long, each flower with five yellow petals with 10 long conspicuous red stamens. The pods are densely covered in short, red glandular hairs.
It is a striking ornamental plant native to tropical America, mainly Argentina and Uruguay. It is naturalised in Texas, and fairly common in the rest of the southwestern United States, where it is known as bird of paradise bush,desert bird of paradise, yellow bird of paradise, and barba de chivo.
Although it is a tropical plant adapted to dry climate, it also thrives in the climate of Avsa and neighbouring islands in the south of Sea of Marmara in northwestern Turkey, where it is commonly known as Paşabıyığı (Pasabiyigi),Cennetkuşu ağacı (Cennetkusu agaci), which in Turkish means "bird of paradise tree," and Bodurakasya, which means "dwarf acacia". This species is also fairly common in the Karoo of South Africa.
Caesalpinia gilliesii
Scientific classification
Kingdom:Plantae
(unranked):Angiosperms
(unranked):Eudicots
(unranked):Rosids
Order:Fabales
Family:Fabaceae
Genus:Caesalpinia
Species:C. gilliesii
Binomial name
Caesalpinia gilliesii
(Wallich ex Hook.)Wallich ex D. Dietr.

























Can planting/growing/watching/learning about Flowers make You Happier?
It Can!

Below is a link to a great paper that explores this accepted truth. This is an excerpt of the Introduction. Please visit the page to view the complete article:
http://www.epjournal.net/wp-content/uploads/ep03104132.pdf
Evolutionary Psychology 
human-nature.com/ep – 2005. 3: 104-132 
¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯¯
Original Article
An Environmental Approach to Positive Emotion: Flowers 
Jeannette Haviland-Jones, Department of Psychology, Rutgers-The State University of New Jersey, 
New Brunswick, NJ. 08903, USA. Email: baljones@rci.rutgers.edu. 
Holly Hale Rosario, Department of Psychology, Rutgers-The State University of New Jersey, New 
Brunswick, NJ. 08903, USA. 
Patricia Wilson, Department of Psychology, La Salle University, Philadelphia, PA 19141, USA. 
Terry R. McGuire, Department of Genetics, Rutgers-The State University of New Jersey, New 
Brunswick, NJ. 08903, USA.


Abstract: For more than 5000 years, people have cultivated flowers although there is 
no known reward for this costly behavior. In three different studies we show that 
flowers are a powerful positive emotion “inducer”. In Study 1, flowers, upon 
presentation to women, always elicited the Duchenne or true smile. Women who 
received flowers reported more positive moods 3 days later. In Study 2, a flower 
given to men or women in an elevator elicited more positive social behavior than 
other stimuli. In Study 3, flowers presented to elderly participants (55+ age) elicited 
positive mood reports and improved episodic memory. Flowers have immediate and 
long-term effects on emotional reactions, mood, social behaviors and even memory 
for both males and females. There is little existing theory in any discipline that 
explains these findings. We suggest that cultivated flowers are rewarding because 
they have evolved to rapidly induce positive emotion in humans, just as other plants 
have evolved to induce varying behavioral responses in a wide variety of species 
leading to the dispersal or propagation of the plants. 
Keywords: positive psychology; emotion; happiness; flowers; memory; social distance;
Duchenne smile.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nerium

Nerium

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Nerium oleander /ˈnɪəriəm ˈl.ændər/[2] is an evergreen shrub or small tree in the dogbane familyApocynaceae, toxic in all its parts. It is the only species currently classified in the genus Nerium. It is most commonly known as oleander, from its superficial resemblance to the unrelated olive Olea.[Note 1] It is so widely cultivated that no precise region of origin has been identified, though southwest Asia has been suggested. The ancient city of Volubilis in Morocco may have taken its name from the Berber name oualilt for the flower.[3]Oleander is one of the most poisonous of commonly grown garden plants.
Nerium
Nerium oleander in flower
Scientific classification
Kingdom:Plantae
(unranked):Angiosperms
(unranked):Eudicots
(unranked):Asterids
Order:Gentianales
Family:Apocynaceae
Subfamily:Apocynoideae
Tribe:Wrightieae
Genus:Nerium
L.
Species:N. oleander
Binomial name
Nerium oleander
L.















































...this is brendasue signing off from Rainbow Creek.  See You next time! Take care of your plants and pets in this heat. 
Take care of Yourself!!!!!!
O+O