Hi Everybody!!

Hi Everybody!!
Welcome to my Hometown!!

Thursday, December 20, 2012

THE DARK NIGHT RIDES IN ON AN ICE DRAGON NAMED DRACO (WHAT'S IN A NAME ANYWAY-PHOTO BOG)


Hi Everybody!!
WOW- I got slapped with a Serpent Tail of the Winter Storm: DRACO.  It felt like a bullwhip strike across my face as I went out in the pre-dawn hours to see Draco. The wind was zip whipping and howling. Those Icy fingers were so cold.
Yesterday, (before the grand entrance of the winter dragon breath), It was warm and windy. They striped the sky which made the created clouds bubble up in the sun.  I do not know how setting rivers of clouds on a 40 mile an hour wind would make the effects of the blizzard any less. Seems to me like more clouds in the upper atmosphere would ride over the cold air and make things worse. Let me know if things were better for You guys up North due to the weather intervention You received!
I had some extremely happy guests yesterday. The buzzards were having so much fun flying in the high winds that they did not land in the sun tree! So I stood out in the road and photographed the buzzards flying in and the clouds growing out of white chemical dots into big, bad Leroy Browns! My clear blue morning skies clouded up and were sailing North at a high rate of speed!
Your photostudy is this buzzard ballet in the storm clouds. (For those of You who do not care for black dots in the sky, scroll on down to the closing vids!)

I am working on a dancing blogpost for later on. I will post it at 11:00PM (tonight), so we can all dance for Peace in the New Age arriving at midnight!
Enjoy!

Draco coils around the north celestial pole, as depicted in Urania's Mirror, a set of constellation cards published in London c.1825

Draco (constellation)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Draco is a constellation in the far northern sky. Its name is Latin for dragon. Draco iscircumpolar (that is, never setting) for many observers in the northern hemisphere. It was one of the 48 constellations listed by the 2nd century astronomer Ptolemy, and remains one of the 88 modern constellations today. The north pole of the ecliptic is in Draco.
Draco
Constellation
Draco
List of stars in Draco
AbbreviationDra
GenitiveDraconis
Pronunciation
Symbolismthe Dragon
Right ascension17 h
Declination+65°
QuadrantNQ3
Area1083 sq. deg. (8th)
Main stars14
Bayer/Flamsteed
stars
76
Stars with planets14
Stars brighter than 3.00m3
Stars within 10.00 pc (32.62 ly)7
Brightest starγ Dra(Eltanin) (2.24m)
Nearest starStruve 2398
(11.52 ly, 3.53 pc)
Messier objects1
Meteor showersDraconids
Bordering
constellations
Visible at latitudes between +90° and −15°.
Best visible at 21:00 (9 p.m.) during the month of July.

File:DracoCC.jpg
The constellation Draco as it can be seen by the naked eye.
Dragons in Greek mythology that may have inspired the constellation's name include Ladon, the dragon who guarded the golden apples of the Hesperides.[6]Hercules killed Ladon during his 12 labors; he was tasked with stealing the golden apples. the constellation of Hercules is depicted near Draco.[1]
In Greco- Roman legend, Draco was a dragon killed by the goddess Minervaand tossed into the sky upon his defeat. The dragon was one of the Giant Titans, who battled the Olympic gods for ten years. As Minerva threw the dragon, it became twisted on itself and froze at the cold North Celestial Polebefore it could right itself.[6]
Sometimes, Draco is represented as the demon son of GaiaTyphon.[6]
Traditional Arabic astronomy does not depict a dragon in modern-day Draco, which is called the Mother Camels. Instead, two hyenas, represented by Eta Draconis and Zeta Draconis are seen attacking a baby camel (a dim star nearBeta Draconis), which is protected by four female camels, represented by Beta DraconisGamma DraconisNu Draconis, and Xi Draconis. The nomads who own the camels are camped nearby, represented by a cooking tripod composed of UpsilonTau, and Sigma Draconis.[7]

[edit]Religion

Early Christians[citation needed] saw Draco as the serpent who tempted Adam and Eve in the Garden of Eden. (See Book of Genesischapter 3)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Draco_(constellation)




Draco the Constellation


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oUcj4mGSrJk




  1. News for draco

    1. Winter Storm Draco Hampers Holiday Travel: What You Need To Know
      International Business Times ‎- 14 hours ago
      Winter Storm Draco may bring a white end to 2012 for many, but it could also severely disrupt holiday travel across the United States.
  2. Winter Storm Draco Targets Midwest, New England - weather.com

    www.weather.com/.../winter-storm-draco-west-midwest-20121...
    1 day ago – Weather.com helps you be prepared for bitter cold, extreme heat and more. Winter Storm Draco will bring snow from the Rockies to the Midwest ...



DANGEROUS Winter Storm Draco - extreme blizzard conditions


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PyMgT6ucdIs





http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ScFdPRWQYDQ

3MIN News December 20, 2012: I  AM HAARP"

Suspicious0bservers





http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vulDI9_aMQ0



Blizzard Time Lapse: Dubuque, Iowa (12/20/2012)



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ca1yM--h_6o





http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Draco_(lawgiver)

Draco (lawgiver)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Draco (play /ˈdrk/GreekΔράκωνDrakōn) (circa 7th century BC) was the first legislatorof Athens in Ancient Greece. He replaced the prevailing system of oral law and blood feudby a written code to be enforced only by a court. Known for its harshness, draconian has come to refer to similarly unforgiving rules or laws.

Life

During the 39th Olympiad, in 622 or 621 BC, Draco established the legal code with which he is identified.
Little is known about his life. He may have belonged to the Greek nobility of the Attica deme called the Eupatridae,[citation needed] with which the 10th-century Suda text records him as contemporaneous, prior to the period of the Seven Sages of Greece. It also relates afolkloric story of his death in the Aeginetan theatre.[1] In a traditional ancient Greek show of approval, his supporters "threw so many hats and shirts and cloaks on his head that he suffocated, and was buried in that same theatre".[2]
Aristotle specifies that Draco laid down his legal code in the archonship of Aristaechmus (Ἀρισταίχμος) in 620 or 621 BC.[3]

[edit]Draconian constitution

The laws (θεσμοί - thesmoi) he laid down were the first written constitution of Athens. So that no one would be unaware of them, they were posted on wooden tablets (ἄξονες - axones), where they were preserved for almost two centuries, on steles of the shape of three-sided pyramids (κύρβεις - kyrbeis).[citation needed] The tablets were called axones, perhaps because they could be pivoted along the pyramid's axis, to read any side.
The constitution featured several major innovations:
The laws, however, were particularly harsh. For example, any debtor whose status was lower than that of his creditor was forced into slavery.[citation needed] The punishment was more lenient for those owing debt to a member of a lower class. The death penalty was thepunishment for even minor offences. Concerning the liberal use of the death penalty in the Draconic code, Plutarch states: "It is said that Drakon himself, when asked why he had fixed the punishment of death for most offences, answered that he considered these lesser crimes to deserve it, and he had no greater punishment for more important ones."[4]
All his laws were repealed by Solon in the early 6th century BC, with the exception of the homicide law.[5]

[edit]Law of Homicide

After much debate from the Athenians, it was decided to revise the laws, including the homicide law, in 409. The homicide law is a highly fragmented inscription, but it does state that it is up to the victim’s relatives to prosecute a killer. According to the preserved part of the inscription, unintentional homicides receive a sentence of exile, while intentional murders are punishable by death. Apart from the inscriptions very little is known about Draco’s background or the nature of most of his laws. However, the significance of his work was prevalent when most of his laws were successfully abolished by Solon.

[edit]Council of Four Hundred

Draco introduced the lot-chosen Council of Four Hundred (in reality, 401)[6]—distinct from the Areopagus—which evolved in later constitutions to play a large role in Athenian democracy. Aristotle notes that Draco, while having the laws written, merely legislated for an existing unwritten Athenian constitution,[7] such as setting exact qualifications for eligibility for office.
Draco extended the franchise to all free men who could furnish themselves with a set of military equipment. They elected the Council of Four Hundred from among their number; nine Archons and the Treasurers were drawn from persons possessing an unencumbered property of not less than ten minas, the generals (strategoi) and commanders of cavalry (hipparchoi) from those who could show an unencumbered property of not less than a hundred minas, and had children born in lawful wedlock over ten years of age. Thus, in the event of their death, their estate could pass to a competent heir. These officers were required to hold to account the prytanes(councillors), strategoi (generals) and hipparchoi (cavalry officers) of the preceding year until their accounts had been audited. "The Council of Areopagus was guardian of the laws, and kept watch over the magistrates to see that they executed their offices in accordance with the laws. Any person who felt himself wronged might lay an information before the Council of Areopagus, on declaring what law was broken by the wrong done to him. But, as has been said before, loans were secured upon the persons of the debtors, and the land was in the hands of a few.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Draco

Draco

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Draco commonly refers to:
  • Draco is the Latin word for dragon.
Draco may also refer to:

[edit]Science and technology

[edit]History

  • Dacian Draco, a Dacian military standard composed of a wolf head and snake tail
  • Draco (lawgiver) (from Greek: Δράκων), the first lawgiver of ancient Athens, Greece, from whom the term draconian is derived
  • Draco (physician) (from Greek: Δράκων), the name of several physicians in the family of Hippocrates
  • Draco (military standard), a Roman cavalry military standard in the shape of a dragon, adopted after the Dacian Wars

[edit]Literature, film, and television

  • Draco Malfoy, a character in the Harry Potter series of books and movies
  • Draco, the name of the last dragon in the film Dragonheart.
  • Draco, a warlord character in the television series Xena: Warrior Princess
  • Antares Draco, an Imperial Knight from Star Wars: Legacy
  • Jaq Draco, an Inquisitor who is the protagonist of Ian Watson's Inquisition War Trilogy

[edit]Games

[edit]Other uses

  • Draco, a supposed reptilian alien race that has been purported to exist by certain UFO conspiracy theorists
  • Draco Racing, a motorsports team
  • Draco Rosa, a Puerto Rican songwriter and former member of Puerto Rican boy band Menudo
  • A guitar built by BC Rich guitars. It has a cutaway V body with Rockfeild pickups.
  • A Romanian-made shortened pistol version of the AKM assault rifle




DragonHeart - Draco


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qFxG8qS2OoE











































































































































































































































































































































































































This video is public.White Christmas_0001.wmv 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vf-Z2QYv7YY



...this is brendasue signing off from Rainbow Creek. See You Next Time!

Of Course, 2 more great White Winter Landscapes, beautiful vids:

Winter Landscapes With Music. Part.1


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=52e3m4TFJzI






fintajo1fintajo1

Winter Landscapes With Music. Part.2.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=srhBVwwIzx8






Date/TimeThumbnailDimensionsUserComment
current15:04, 19 May 2009Thumbnail for version as of 15:04, 19 May 2009367 × 255(18 KB)Urania's Muse(talk | contribs)Draco, with Ursa Minor, as depicted in [http://www.ianridpath.com/atlases/urania.htm Urania’s Mirror], a set of constellation cards published in London c. 1825. {{PD-old}}

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Dracourania.jpg
O+O