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Tuesday, January 8, 2013

JANUARY 6, 2013-Part Two: The Epiphany (An Epiphany Photo Blog)


Hi Everybody!!
Dad's Birthday Continues...........
January 6, 2013 will be an important day in History even if You do not see it yet! You know how You continue to hear your Dad's words from time to time throughout your life? Another quick 'Dadism': "This is who we are: You tell anybody where we come from we call a spade a spade". Words ingrained in my brain. Whenever he said it, I pictured the big ace of spades card and said: Okay! Well, a few months ago, I heard one of my netfriends say:  
 I call a shovel a shovel. I giggled and wondered why he would say shovel when it is suppose to be spade???????
Then the big DUH moment: A shovel is also called a spade in old days. For over fifty years, I have simply been incorrect on my understanding of the old words!! It was only the ace of spades in my head-to Dad it was likely always a shovel.
January 6 is a holiday celebrated the world over as:  the Epiphany. Below I share excerpts from a Wikipedia Page
on The Epiphany with comparison customs from different countries around the world. (please see link for complete list). It is important you learn this.
I got a big epiphany on this Epiphany Holiday/Dad's Birthday. It is in this definition that I began to see why the water is so important by Alaska. See what you see as you note different words have different meanings for the same custom.
An epiphany refers to a striking breakthrough or or manifestation or “enlightening realization” that enables someone to more deeply understand a problem or situation. Epiphanies usually come after much thought, study, deep consideration of the problem.

http://benfranklinfollies.com/2013/01/06/epiphany-the-power-of-action/

https://plus.google.com/.../posts/CG924zVXY7PShare


Sheree Martin – Jan 6, 2013 –
http://benfranklinfollies.com/2013/01/06/epiphany-the-power-of-action/Epiphany: The Power of ActionEpiphany: The Power of Action

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epiphany_(holiday)

Epiphany (holiday)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Epiphany (Koine Greek: ἐπιφάνεια, epiphaneia, "manifestation", "striking appearance"[1]) or Theophany[2] (Ancient Greek (ἡ) Θεοφάνεια, Τheophaneia meaning "vision of God"[3]), which traditionally falls on January 6, is a Christian feast day that celebrates the revelation of God the Son as a human being in Jesus Christ. Western Christians commemorate principally (but not solely) the visitation of the Biblical Magi to the Baby Jesus, and thus Jesus' physical manifestation to the GentilesEastern Christians commemorate thebaptism of Jesus in the Jordan River, seen as his manifestation to the world as the Son of God.[4]
Eastern Churches following the Julian Calendar observe the Theophany feast on what for most countries is January 19[5] because of the 13-day difference today between that calendar and the generally used Gregorian calendar.[6]
Since 1970, the rule for the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church is: "The Epiphany of the Lord is celebrated on 6 January, unless, where it is not observed as a Holy day of obligation, it has been assigned to the Sunday occurring between 2 and 8 January."[7]
In the Church of England also, the feast may be celebrated on the Sunday between January 2 and 8 inclusive[citation needed] although the official date of epiphany in the UK is always 6 January.[citation needed]
A separate celebration of the Baptism of the Lord was introduced for Latin Rite Roman Catholics in 1955.[8] Initially, this was to be held on January 13, previously the octave day of the Epiphany, but in the 1969 revision of the General Roman Calendar the date was changed to the first Sunday after January 6.[9] In countries where in a particular year the Epiphany falls on January 7 or 8, the feast of the Baptism of the Lord is celebrated on the following Monday. In the Church of England, the same custom may be followed. In theEpiscopal Church in the United States, the feast of the Baptism of the Lord is always the Sunday after January 6.
Alternative names for the feast include (τα) Θεοφάνια, Theophany as neuter plural rather than feminine singular, η Ημέρα των Φώτων, i Imera ton Foton (modern Greek pronunciation), hē hēmera tōn phōtōn (restored classic pronunciation), "The Day of the Lights", and τα Φώτα, ta Fota, "The Lights"

Etymology and original word usage

The Koine Greek ἐπιφάνεια, epiphaneia derives from the verb "to appear" and means "manifestation," "appearance." In classical Greek it was used of the appearance of dawn, of an enemy in war, but especially of a manifestation of a deity to a worshipper (a theophany).[11]In the Septuagint the word is used for a manifestation of the God of Israel (2 Maccabees 15:27).[12] In the New Testament the word is used in 2 Timothy 1:10 to refer either to the birth of Christ[11] or to his appearance after his resurrection, and five times to refer to theSecond Coming.[11][12]

[edit]History

The observance had its origins in the Eastern Christian Churches and was a general celebration of the manifestation of the Incarnation ofJesus Christ. It included the commemoration of his birth; the visit of the Magi[note 1] to Bethlehem; all of Jesus' childhood events, up to and including his baptism in the Jordan by John the Baptist; and even the miracle at the wedding at Cana in Galilee.[13] It seems fairly clear that the Baptism was the primary event being commemorated.[14][15]
Christians fixed the date of the feast on January 6 quite early in their history. Ancient liturgiesnoted Illuminatio, Manifestatio, Declaratio (Illumination, Manifestation, Declaration); cf.Matthew 3:13–17Luke 3:22; and John 2:1–11; where the Baptism and the Marriage at Cana were dwelt upon. Western Christians have traditionally emphasized the "Revelation to the Gentiles" mentioned in Luke, where the term Gentile means all non-Jewish peoples. TheBiblical Magi, who represented the non-Jewish peoples of the world, paid homage to the infant Jesus in stark contrast to Herod the Great (King of Judea), who sought to kill him.[16] In this event, Christian writers also inferred a revelation to the Children of Israel. Saint John Chrysostom identified the significance of the meeting between the Magi and Herod's court: "The star had been hidden from them so that, on finding themselves without their guide, they would have no alternative but to consult the Jews. In this way the birth of Jesus would be made known to all."[17]
The earliest reference to Epiphany as a Christian feast was in A.D. 361, by Ammianus Marcellinus[18] St. Epiphanius says that January 6 is hemera genethlion toutestin epiphanion(Christ's "Birthday; that is, His Epiphany").[19] He also asserts that the Miracle at Cana occurred on the same calendar day.[20]
In 385, the pilgrim Egeria (also known as Silvia) described a celebration in Jerusalem andBethlehem, which she called "Epiphany" (epiphania) that commemorated the Nativity of Christ.[21] Even at this early date, there was an octave associated with the feast.
In a sermon delivered on 25 December 380, St. Gregory of Nazianzus referred to the day as ta theophania ("the Theophany", an alternative name for Epiphany), saying expressly that it is a day commemorating he hagia tou Christou gennesis ("the holy nativity of Christ") and told his listeners that they would soon be celebrating the baptism of Christ.[22] Then, on January 6 and 7, he preached two more sermons,[23] wherein he declared that the celebration of the birth of Christ and the visitation of the Magi had already taken place, and that they would now commemorate his Baptism.[24] At this time, celebration of the two events was beginning to be observed on separate occasions, at least in Cappadocia.
Saint John Cassian says that even in his time (beginning of the 5th century), the Egyptian monasteries celebrated the Nativity and Baptism together on January 6.[25] The Armenian Apostolic Church continues to celebrate January 6 as the only commemoration of the Nativity.

[edit]Carol

Perhaps the most familiar Christmas carol associated with Epiphany is "We Three Kings of Orient Are", written by the Reverend John Henry Hopkins, Jr., then an ordained deacon in the Episcopal Church,[29] instrumental in organizing an elaborate holiday pageant (which featured this hymn) for the students of the General Theological Seminary in New York City in 1857 while serving as the seminary's music director.

[edit]Epiphany in different Christian traditions

Epiphany is celebrated by both the Eastern and Western Churches, but a major difference between them is precisely which events the feast commemorates. For Western Christians, the feast primarily commemorates the coming of the Magi, with only a minor reference to the baptism of Jesus and the miracle at the Wedding at Cana. Eastern churches celebrate the Baptism of Christ in the Jordan. In both traditions, the essence of the feast is the same: the manifestation of Christ to the world (whether as an infant or in the Jordan), and the Mystery of the Incarnation. The miracle at the Wedding at Cana is also celebrated during Epiphany as a first manifestation of Christ's public life.

[edit]Western Christian churches


The Three Magi: Balthasar, Melchior, and Gaspar, from a late 6th century mosaic at the Basilica of Sant'Apollinare Nuovo inRavennaItaly.

K † M † B † 2009 written on a door of rectory in Lstiboř village, Czech Republic to bless the house by Christ
Even before the year 354,[30] the Western Church had separated the celebration of the Nativity of Christ as the feast of Christmas and set its date as December 25; it reserved January 6 as a commemoration of the manifestation of Christ, especially to the Magi, but also at his baptism and at the wedding feast of Cana.[31] Hungarians, in an apparent reference to baptism, refer to the January 6 celebration as Vízkereszt which term recalls the words "víz" as water, "kereszt, kereszt-ség" as baptism. In parts of the Eastern Church, January 6 continued for some time as a composite feast that included the Nativity of Jesus: though Constantinople adopted December 25 to commemorate Jesus' birth in the fourth century, in other parts the Nativity of Jesus continued to be celebrated on January 6, a date later devoted exclusively to commemorating his Baptism.[30]

[edit]Liturgical practice in Western churches

The West observes a twelve-day festival, starting on December 25, and ending on January 5, known as Christmastide or the Twelve Days of Christmas. Some Christian cultures, especially those of Latin America and some in Europe, extend the season to as many as forty days, ending on Candlemas (February 2).
On the Feast of the Epiphany, the priest, wearing white vestments, will bless the Epiphany water, frankincense, gold, and chalk. Chalk is used to write the initials of the three magi over the doors of churches and homes. The letters stand for the initials of the Magi (traditionally named Caspar, Melchior, and Balthasar), and also the phrase Christus mansionem benedicat, which translates as "may Christ bless the house".
According to ancient custom, the priest announced the date of Easter on the feast of Epiphany. This tradition dated from a time when calendars were not readily available, and the church needed to publicize the date of Easter, since many celebrations of the liturgical yeardepend on it.[32] The proclamation may be sung or proclaimed at the ambo by a deacon,cantor, or reader either after the reading of the Gospel or after the postcommunion prayer.[32]
The Roman Missal thus provides a formula with appropriate chant (in the tone of the Exsultet) for proclaiming on Epiphany, wherever it is customary to do so, the dates in the calendar for the celebration of Ash WednesdayEaster SundayAscension of Jesus ChristPentecost,the Body and Blood of Christ, and the First Sunday of Advent that will mark the following liturgical year.

[edit]Date of commemoration

Prior to the reform of 1955, when Pope Pius XII abolished all but three liturgical octaves, the Latin Church celebrated Epiphany as an eight-day feast, known as the Octave of Epiphany, beginning on January 6 and ending on January 13. The Sunday within that octave was at that time the feast of the Holy Family, and Christmastide was reckoned as the twelve days ending on January 5, followed by Epiphany time, January 6–13. The following Sundays, until Septuagesima, were named as the "First (etc.) Sunday after Epiphany". The 1969 revision of the General Roman Calendar defined Christmastide instead as extending from the Vigil Mass of Christmas on the evening of December 24 to the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord (generally the Sunday after January 6).[33]
Prior to 1976, the Anglican churches also observed an eight-day feast. Today The Epiphany of our Lord[34] is classified as a Principal Feast and is observed on January 6 (e.g., the Anglican Church of Canada[34]) or on the Sunday between January 2 and 8. There is also an Epiphany season, observed between the season of Christmas and the first period of Ordinary Time. It begins at Evening Prayer on the Eve of the Epiphany, and ends at Evening Prayer (or Night Prayer) on the Feast of the Presentation.
LutheranUnited Methodist and United Church of Christ congregations, along with those of other denominations, may celebrate Epiphany on January 6, on the following Sunday within the Epiphany week (octave), or at another time (Epiphany Eve January 5, the nearest Sunday, etc.) as local custom dictates.[35][36] In these denominations and others, marking the festival's importance, all of the Sundays following are marked as the first, second, third, Nth, etc.,"Sunday after Epiphany" up until the beginning of Lent in February or March; these intervening weeks commonly being called the Epiphany season.[37]
Eastern churches celebrate Epiphany (Theophany) on January 6. Some, such as those in Greece, employ the modern Gregorian calendar, while others, such as those in Russia, hold to the older Julian calendar for reckoning church dates. In these old-calendar churches Epiphany falls on January 19 today - which is January 6 in the Julian calendar.

Liturgical practice in Eastern churches

Forefeast: The liturgical Forefeast of Theophany begins on January 1, and concludes with the Paramony on January 5.
Paramony: The Eve of the Feast is called Paramony (GreekπαραμονήSlavonicnavechérie). Paramony is observed as a strict fast day, on which those faithful who are physically able, refrain from food until the first star is observed in the evening, when a meal with wine and oil may be taken. On this day the Royal Hours are celebrated, thus tying together the feasts of Nativity and Good Friday. The Royal Hours are followed by the Divine Liturgy of St. Basil which combines Vespers with the Divine Liturgy. During the Vespers, fifteenOld Testament lections which foreshadow the Baptism of Christ are read, and special antiphons are chanted. If the Feast of the Theophany falls on a Sunday or Monday, the Royal Hours are chanted on the previous Friday, and on the Paramony the Vesperal Divine Liturgy of St. John Chrysostom is celebrated and the fasting is lessened to some degree.

Theophany Crucession in Bulgaria. The priests are going to throw a wooden cross in the Yantra river. Believers will then jump into the icy waters to "save" the cross.
Blessing of Waters: The Orthodox Churches perform the Great Blessing of Waters on Theophany.[40] The blessing is normally done twice: once on the Eve of the Feast—usually at a Baptismal font inside the church—and then again on the day of the feast, outdoors at a body of water. Following the Divine Liturgy, the clergy and people go in aCrucession (procession with the cross) to the nearest body of water, be it a beach, harbor, quay, river, lake, swimming pool, water depot, etc. (ideally, it should be a body of "living water"). At the end of the ceremony the priest will bless the waters. In the Greek practice, he does this by casting a cross into the water. If swimming is feasible on the spot, any number of volunteers may try to recover the cross. The person who gets the cross first swims back and returns it to the priest, who then delivers a special blessing to the swimmer and their household. Certain such ceremonies have achieved particular prominence, such as the one held annually at Tarpon Springs, Florida. In Russia, where the winters are severe, a hole will be cut into the ice so that the waters may be blessed. In such conditions, the cross is not cast into the water, but is held securely by the priest and dipped three times into the water.

Greek Orthodox bishop at the Great Blessing of Waterson Theophany, releasing the cross off the Glenelg Jetty,South Australia, for one of the swimmers below to retrieve.
The water that is blessed on this day is known as "Theophany Water" and is taken home by the faithful, and used with prayer as a blessing. People will not only bless themselves and their homes by sprinkling with Theophany Water, but will also drink it. The Orthodox Church teaches that Theophany Water differs from regular holy water in that with Theophany Water, the very nature of the water is changed and becomes incorrupt,[41] a miracle attested to as early as St. John Chrysostom.[42]
Theophany is a traditional day for performing Baptisms, and this is reflected in the Divine Liturgy by singing the baptismal hymn, "As many as have been baptized into Christ, have put on Christ. Alleluia," in place of the Trisagion.
House Blessings: On Theophany the priest will begin making the round of the parishioner's homes to bless them. He will perform a short prayer service in each home, and then go through the entire house, gardens and outside-buildings, blessing them with the newly blessed Theophany Water, while all sing the Troparion and Kontakion of the feast. This is normally done on Theophany, or at least during the Afterfeast, but if the parishioners are numerous, and especially if many live far away from the church, it may take some time to bless each house. Traditionally, these blessings should all be finished before the beginning of Great Lent).
Afterfeast: The Feast of Theophany is followed by an eight-day Afterfeast on which the normal fasting laws are suspended. The Saturday and Sunday after Theophany have special readings assigned to them, which relate to the Temptation of Christ and to penance and perseverance in the Christian struggle. There is thus a liturgical continuum between the Feast of Theophany and the beginning of Great Lent.

Britain

In Britain, the celebration of the Night before Epiphany, Epiphany Eve, is known as Twelfth Night (The first night of Christmas is December 25–26, and Twelfth Night is January 5–6), and was a traditional time for mumming and the wassail. The yule log was left burning until this day, and the charcoal left was kept until the next Christmas to kindle next year's yule log, as well as to protect the house from fire and lightning.[47] In the past, Epiphany was also a day for playing practical jokes, similar to April Fool's Day. Today in England, Twelfth Night is still as popular a day for plays as when Shakespeare's Twelfth Night was first performed in 1601, and annual celebrations involving the Holly Man are held in London.[48] A traditional dish for Epiphany was Twelfth Cake, a rich, dense, typically English fruitcake. As in Europe, whoever found the baked-in bean was king for a day, but unique to English tradition other items were sometimes included in the cake. Whoever found the clove was the villain, the twig, the fool, and the rag, the tart. Anything spicy or hot, like ginger snaps and spiced ale, was considered proper Twelfth Night fare, recalling the costly spices brought by the Wise Men. Another English Epiphany dessert was the jam tart, but made into a six-point star for the occasion to symbolize the Star of Bethlehem, and thus called Epiphany tart. The discerning English cook sometimes tried to use thirteen different coloured jams on the tart on this day for luck, creating a dessert with the appearance of stained glass.

United States

In the United States, in Colorado around Manitou Springs, Epiphany is marked by the Great Fruitcake Toss. Fruitcakes are thrown, participants dress as kings, fools, etc., and competitions are held for the farthest throw, the most creative projectile device, etc. As with customs in other countries, the fruitcake toss is a sort of festive symbolic leave-taking of the Christmas holidays until next year, but with humorous twist, since fruitcake (although the traditional Christmas bread of America, England and other English speaking nations) is considered in the United States with a certain degree of derision, and is the source of many jokes.[90][91]
In Louisiana, Epiphany is the beginning of the Carnival season, during which it is customary to bake King Cakes, similar to the Rosca mentioned above. It is round in shape, filled with cinnamon, glazed white, and coated in traditional carnival color sanding sugar. The person who finds the doll (or bean) must provide the next king cake. The interval between Epiphany and Mardi Gras is sometimes known as "king cake season", and many may be consumed during this period. The Carnival season begins on King's Day (Epiphany), and there are many traditions associated with that day in Louisiana and along the Catholic coasts of MississippiAlabama, and Florida. King cakes are first sold then, Carnival krewes begin having their balls on that date, and the first New Orleans krewe parades in street cars that night.
In Colonial Virginia Epiphany, or 12th Night, was an occasion of great merriment, and was considered especially appropriate as a date for balls and dancing, as well as for weddings.[92] On 12th Night, Great Cake was prepared, consisting in two giant layers of fruitcake, coated and filled with royal icing. Custom dictated that the youngest child present cut and serve the cake and whoever found the bean or prize in the Twelfth Night cake was crowned "King of the Bean" similar to the European king cake custom.[93]
Tarpon Springs, Florida is known for elaborate religious ceremonies related to the Greek Orthodox Church, the most notable being the Epitphany celebration. The Metropolitan of Atlanta usually presides over the blessings, sometimes joined by the Archbishop of America. The blessings conclude with the ceremonial throwing of a wooden cross into the city's Spring Bayou, and boys ages 16 to 18 diving in to retrieve it. Whoever recovers the cross is said to be blessed for a full year. Following the blessings, the celebration moves to the Sponge Docks where food and music are made part of the festivities.[94] Tarpon Springs has given itself the nickname Epiphany City.[95] The celebration attracts Greek Americans from across the country,[94] and the city's population is known to triple in size for that day

German-speaking Europe


Star Singers visit German President Carstens (1982)
January 6 is a public holiday in Austria, three federal states of Germany, and three cantons of Switzerland, as well as in parts of Graubünden.
In the German-speaking lands, groups of young people called "Sternsinger" (star singers) travel from door to door. They are dressed as the three Wise Men, plus the leader carrying a star, usually of painted wood attached to a broom handle. Often these groups are four girls, or two boys and two girls for the benefit of singing their songs in four-part harmony, not necessarily three wise men at all. German Lutherans often note in a lighthearted fashion that the Bible never specifies that the "Weisen" (Magi) were men, or that there were three. The star singers will be offered treats at the homes they visit, but they also solicit donations for worthy causes, such as efforts to end hunger in Africa, organized jointly by the Catholic and Evangelical-Lutheran churches.[51] As a sign of gratitude, the young people then perform the traditional house blessing, by marking the year over the doorway with chalk. In Roman Catholic communities this may be a serious spiritual event with the priest present even today, but among Protestants it is more a tradition, and a part of the German notion of Gemütlichkeit. Usually on the Sunday following Epiphany, these donations are brought into churches. Here all of the children who have gone out as star singers, once again in their costumes, form a procession of sometimes dozens of wise men and stars. The German Chancellor and Parliament also receive a visit from the star singers at Epiphany.[52]

Traditional house blessing in chalk, written by Sternsinger on the door beam of the home.
Germans eat a Three Kings cake which may be a golden pastry ring filled with orange and spice representing gold, frankincense and myrrh. Most often found in Switzerland, these cakes take the form of Buchteln but for Epiphany, studded with citron, and baked as seven large buns in a round rather than square pan, forming a crown. Or they may be made of typical rich Christmas bread dough with cardamom and pearl sugar in the same seven bun crown shape. These varieties are most typically purchased in supermarkets with the trinket, and gold paper crown included.[53] As in other countries, the person who receives the piece or bun containing the trinket or whole almond becomes the king or queen for a day. Epiphany is also an especially joyful occasion for the young and young at heart as this is the day dedicated to plündern – that is, when Christmas trees are "plundered" of their cookies and sweets by eager children (and adults) and when gingerbread houses, and any other good things left in the house from Christmas are devoured.[54] Lastly, there is a German rhyme saying, or "Bauernregel", that goes "Ist's bis Dreikönigs kein Winter, kommt keiner dahinter" meaning "If there hasn't been any Winter (weather) until Epiphany, none is coming afterward." [55] Another of these "Bauernregel", (German farmer's rules) for Epiphany states: "Dreikönigsabend hell und klar, verspricht ein gutes Weinjahr" or "If the eve of Epiphany is bright and clear, it fortells a good wine year.

Russia

The Epiphany, celebrated in Russia on January 19, marks the baptism of Jesus in the Orthodox Church. As elsewhere in the Orthodox world, the Russian Church conducts the rite of the Great Blessing of the Waters, also known as "the Great Sanctification of the Water" on that day (or the eve before).[84] The priest-led procession could simply proceed to the font,[84] but traditionally the worshipers would go to a nearby lake or river.
Historical records indicate that the blessing of the waters events took place at the courts of Moscow Czars since no later than 1525. According to historians, the blessing of the waters procession was the most magnificent of the annual Czar's court's ceremonies, comparable only to such special events as royal coronations and weddings. After a divine liturgy in the Kremlin's Dormition Cathedral, the procession, led by the Czar and the Patriarch of Moscow would proceed to the frozen Moscow River. A small gazebo, called Iordan', would have been erected on the ice and decorated with holy icons, one of which would depict the Baptism of Christ. The Patriarch would immerse his cross into the river's water; and sprinkle the Czar, his boyars, and the banners of Czar's army's regiments with the holy water. A load of holy water would then be brought back to the Kremlin, to be used in blessing the Czar's palace.[85] On a smaller scale, similar events would take place in the parishes throughout the nation.
Believing that on this day water becomes holy and is imbued with special powers, Russians cut holes in the ice of lakes and rivers, often in the shape of the cross, to bathe in the freezing water.[86] This practice is said to be popularized comparatively recently; it was fairly uncommon in the czarist days, but has flourished since the 1990s.[87] Participants in the ritual may dip themselves three times under the water, honoring the Holy Trinity, to symbolically wash away their sins from the past year, and to experience a sense of spiritual rebirth. Orthodox priests are on hand to bless the water, and rescuers are on hand to monitor the safety of the swimmers in the ice-cold water.
Other less intrepid Russians may limit their participation in the Epiphany rites to those conducted inside churches, where priests perform the Great Blessing of Waters, both on Epiphany Eve and Epiphany (Theophany) proper. The water is then distributed to attendees who may store it to use in times of illness, to bless themselves, family members, and their homes, or to drink. Some Russians think any water - even from the taps on the kitchen sink - poured or bottled on Epiphany becomes holy water, since all the water in the world is blessed this day. In the more mild climate of the southern city of Sochi meanwhile, where air and water temperatures both hover in the low to mid 10 degree Celsius range (50 degrees Fahrenheit) in January, thousands of people jump into the Black Sea at midnight each year on Epiphany and begin to swim in celebration of the feast
Feature Presentation: 
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Join the 'Tube and put your two cents out there! I will share you on the blog if you tell me about your vid, if it's good-put your mouth where your money is, in your tech toys, the phones and stuff! (I still do not have a cell phone and likely never will). Anyway-make a vid-
A Great Presentation of the Truth by: Mr. Maverickstar (thank you sir, for sharing with us on the Nature Blog)

pole shift news are you ready for the heat

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yOd8u8sAyiw

'HAARP' TTA SHOCKS THE WORLD with Ascension Isle Hydroacoustic SOUTH ATLANTIC DIAMOND FLARE !!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=isG6V7RcF7E

Special Weather & Living Sky Update 1-4-2013 Livermore, CO USA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FgoYEgcvLBg


INSIDER INFORMATION - The Time Has Come To Tell... NIBIRU & DECEPTION - What Nobody Ever Told You...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HrqGcWIgVN4
...this is brendasue signing off from Rainbow Creek. I am working on JANUARY 6, 2013 Part Three------
Oh, I have so much more. What a gift I received on Dad's Birthday-
My Epiphany 

O+O